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Before the Moon

 

Brief summary

A workshop that specifically addresses the 50-100 Myr time period in early solar system history from "Before the Moon".  The Scientific Organizing Committee (Audrey Bouvier, Ramon Brasser, Shigeru Ida, Stephen Mojzsis, Sara Russell, Hidenori Genda) are organizing a workshop at the Tokyo Institute of Technology on the topic "Before the Moon" for which the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI), Daiwa Foundation, and the Collaborative for Research in Origins (CRiO) has provided support. It is scheduled for November 6 (arrive) through 11 (depart), 2016. 

Before the Moon

When: November 6-10, 2016

Where: Earth Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan

What: For centuries the formation and early evolution of the Solar System has been an active topic of debate and investigation. Only recently has substantial progress been made that begins to put together a consistent and coherent picture its earliest epoch; the first 50-100 million years. This time span witnessed the emergence of embryonic planets that coalesced to where they had very nearly reached their present-day masses and radii. Much remains unclear, however, of the nature of this primordial evolution. It makes sense at this time to synthesize what we know, highlight key points of agreement and contention, and to provide recommendations for progress.

Specifically, we focus on the evolution of the Solar System from the time of the first solids to before the alleged Giant Impact that formed the Moon. Hence, the title of this workshop: “Before the Moon”.

Focus: ELSI TiTECH will host a small meeting of about twenty five people of broad scope with selected key speakers of international standing. The overall aim is to integrate views and data from cosmochemistry, geochronology, thermal modeling, mantle physics and planetary dynamics to formulate a coherent timeline of the earliest epoch of our planetary system and to frame the current state of the knowledge. 

1. Timescales for formation/appearance of the first solar system solids with special emphasis on growth from dust to pebbles to planetesimals to planetary embryos with a critical eye of what  "minimum disk mass" really means.
2. Dynamical evolution of pebbles vs. planetesimals: growth, plausible population characteristics (size, number) and the end-game of planetary embryos.
3. The state of the solar system on the eve of the Moon-forming event.

Structure: The meeting will last four days and will be a mixture of presentations (45'+5') and discussion. A deliberate objective of this workshop is to produce outlines for manuscript drafts on the last two days. The first two days will consist of contributed presentations from all members showing the current state-of-the-art in their fields, and summary presentations at the end of each day. The third day will be dedicated to the drawing up of detailed outlines for several manuscripts arising from the presentations and attendant discussions. Rough drafts of these manuscripts will be created and circulated on the last day to designated groups at the meeting. Firm deadlines for preparation and submittal to peer-reviewed literature will be decided upon by all participants. We envision that these reports will appear in a special issue of EPSL or ApJ (pending the outcome of negotiations with journal editors and staff). 

VenueConference and Tatami rooms at the old ELSI (#2) building at the Tokyo Institute of Technology campus. The campus has easy access to nearby cafés, restaurants, hotels, public transport and other amenities.

Lodging: The Tokyo Institute of Technology – ELSI office will reserve rooms in a nearby hotel. Normally, paperwork requires that a deposit be made when you check in, that ELSI will reimburse you for in person after the first day of the meeting.

 

Schedule and Abstracts

MONDAY

08:45-08:50 Welcome (Hirose)

08:50-09:00 Introduction (Mojzsis)

Session: First solar system solids and formation timescales (Chair: Mojzsis)

09:00-09:35 Huss: The raw materials for making the solar system

09:35-10:10 Ireland:  Chronology of the early solar system and implications for processes

10:10-10:45 Chaussidon: Constraints on timing and processes from dust to chondrules

Break 15mn

11:00-11:35 Russell: The formation environment of chondrules and calcium aluminium rich inclusions

11:35-12:10 Bouvier: Chronology of early solar system materials and implications for the protoplanetary disk

12:10-13:30 Lunch

Session: Accretionary processes: From dust and planetesimals to planets (Chair: Russell)

13:30-14:04 Ciesla: Dust growth and its effects on transport in disks

14:05-14:40 Ida: Formation of planetesimals

 Break 20mn

 15:00-15:35 Morris: Models for chondrule formation in the early solar nebula

15:35-16:10 Nimmo: Accretion, mixing and differentiation of planetary bodies

16:10-16:45 Brasser: The cool and distant formation of Mars

 Break 15 mn

17:00-18:30: Open Forum: Questions – Discussion – New ideas

 

TUESDAY

Session: Isotopic variations in chondrules and planetary materials (Chair: Bouvier)

08:45-09:20 Qin: Cr isotope systematics of chondrules

09:20-09:55 Alexander: The link between chondrule formation and chondrite accretion

09:55-10:30 Yurimoto: Evolution of planet-forming components in the first millions of years of solar system formation

Break 15mn

10:45-11:20 Fischer-Gödde: Establishing genetical links among solar system materials using nucleosynthetic Ru and Mo isotope anomalies

11:20-11:55 Carlson: Controls on terrestrial planet composition(s)

12:00-13:30 Lunch

Session: Pebbles vs. planetesimals; HSE geochemistry (Chair: Ida)

13:30-14:05 Kretke: Forming the solar system from pebbles

14:05-14:40 Matsumura: The effects of dynamical evolution of giant planets on the elemental abundances of terrestrial planets

Break 20 mn

15:00-15:35 Day: Distribution of highly siderophile and volatile elements in proto-earth materials

15:35-16:10 Yin: Enstatite chondrites, the Earth-like reservoir and the timing of gap opening in the early solar nebula by Jupiter formation

 Break 20 mn

16:30-18:30 Open Forum: Questions – Discussion – New ideas

 

WEDNESDAY

Session: Evening of the Moon-forming event and beyond (Chair: Brasser)

08:45-09:20 Boyet: Magma oceans in the Earth-Moon system

09:20-09:55 Hernlund: What do we really know about magma ocean oxygen fugacity?

09:55-10:30 Mojzsis: Evolved crusts in dynamically ‘hot’ planetary embryos

Break 15mn

10:45-11:20 McKeegan: Oxygen isotopes on an old Moon

11:20-12:00 Open Forum: Questions – Discussion – New ideas

12:00-13:30 Lunch DISASTER DRILL 12:15-13:00

Group formation – writing (13:30-18:00)

 

THURSDAY

Group formation – writing (09:00-12:00)

12:00-13:30 Lunch

Group formation – writing (13:30-16:00)

 

 

Abstracts

THE RAW MATERIALS FOR MAKING THE SOLAR SYSTEM

CHRONOLOGY OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PROCESSES

CONSTRAINTS ON TIMING AND PROCESSES FROM DUST TO CHONDRULES

THE FORMATION ENVIRONMENT OF CHONDRULES AND CALCIUM ALUMINIUM RICH INCLUSIONS

DUST GROWTH AND ITS EFFECTS ON TRANSPORT IN DISKS

FORMATION OF PLANETESIMALS

MODELS FOR CHONDRULE FORMATION IN THE EARLY SOLAR NEBULA

ACCRETION, MIXING AND DIFFERENTIATION OF PLANETARY BODIES

THE COOL AND DISTANT FORMATION OF MARS

CR ISOTOPE SYSTEMATICS OF CHONDRULES

THE LINK BETWEEN CHONDRULE FORMATION AND CHONDRITE ACCRETION

EVOLUTION OF PLANET-FORMING COMPONENTS IN THE FIRST MILLIONS OF YEARS OF SOLAR SYSTEM FORMATION

ESTABLISHING GENETICAL LINKS AMONG SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS USING NUCLEOSYNTHETIC RU AND MO ISOTOPE ANOMALIES

CONTROLS ON TERRESTRIAL PLANET COMPOSITION(S).

FORMING THE SOLAR SYSTEM FROM PEBBLES

THE EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY SIDEROPHILE AND VOLATILE ELEMENTS IN PROTO-EARTH MATERIALS

ENSTATITE CHONDRITES, THE EARTH-LIKE RESERVOIR AND THE TIMING OF GAP OPENING IN THE EARLY SOLAR NEBULA BY JUPITER FORMATION.

MAGMA OCEANS IN THE EARTH-MOON SYSTEM

WHAT DO WE REALLY KNOW ABOUT MAGMA OCEAN OXYGEN FUGACITY?

EVOLVED CRUSTS IN DYNAMICALLY ‘HOT’ PLANETARY EMBRYOS.

OXYGEN ISOTOPES ON AN OLD MOON